1. Skip to content

Asbestos Exposure at Brooklyn Navy Yard

In 1801, the United States government purchased a forty acre tract of waterfront property in Brooklyn, N.Y. for use in military shipbuilding. Five years later, in 1806, this property was officially designated an active U.S. Navy shipyard named the United States Navy Yard, NY – more commonly referred to as the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The yard was especially important during the first and second World Wars, when it operated nonstop and employed over 70,000 workers. Many well-known Navy ships were built at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, including large Aircraft Carriers such as the Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Saratoga, and the Independence.

The Brooklyn Navy Yard became known as a notorious site for asbestos exposure. As most of the Navy vessels built prior to the mid-1970s used asbestos throughout their equipment and construction, the workers at the Navy yard who were tasked with building and maintaining these ships often worked directly with asbestos. Considering the number of people employed and ships built during World War II alone, an enormous number of asbestos exposures took place at this site.

Belluck & Fox has represented many former civilian workers (or Yardbirds) at the Brooklyn Navy Yard who were diagnosed with mesothelioma and lung cancer as a direct result of asbestos exposure at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. We have also represented many Navy veterans who were docked at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. We are very familiar with the Brooklyn Navy Yard site and the ships, including the companies that sold the asbestos-containing products for use in the ships built and repaired there. We know how workers were exposed to asbestos on the ships. Our team has won significant settlements for:

  • Laborers
  • Insulators
  • Printer/Lithographers
  • Shipwrights
  • Welders
  • Sheet Metal Workers
  • Machinst Mates
  • Electrician’s Mates
  • Naval Officers
  • Firemen
  • Stationary Engineers
  • Boilermen
  • Painters
  • Airmen
Close
  • Share to Facebook
  • Share to Google+